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iBook Workshop: Technology Timeline - Computation

by sue
Description:

New: iBook workshop on Consumer Technology is here.

Sunnyvale Heritage Museum is working on a digital version of their Technology Timeline. Children can participate in this interesting project by illustrating stories and questions to trigger new innovations. Children will also learn how to become inventors and innovators.

Contest Begins: Saturday, Feb 15, 2014
Entry deadline: Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 12 midnight

Suggestions:  
- Use 8.5 x 11 letter size for your illustration
- It is a illustration contest, we choose who can express idea with picture, not purely the artistic skill.

Prize winning illustrations will be published on the Museum's website, displayed in the upstairs gallery, and published in the final Sunnyvale Technology Timeline iBook created by StoryRobin, Inc.

Once you have created an illustration, you can submit your project online here.
Or Submit in person at: Sunnyvale Heritage Park Museum. 570 E Remington Dr, Sunnyvale, CA 94087

Questions? Contact:suechen78@gmail.com

Child and Teen Reception & Illustration Winner Announcement:
Date & Time: Sunday, June 8, 2014. 1-4pm.
Location: Sunnyvale Heritage Park Museum. 570 E Remington Dr, Sunnyvale, CA 94087

Want to check out the original Technology Timeline Wall Display?
Come visit the Sunnyvale Heritage Park Museum
Hours:  12 - 4PM Tuesday / Thursday / Sunday

* Fine print: The author/artist retains all copyrights to the submitted work. At the discretion of the Museum and StoryRobin, selected pieces may be published online on the Museum's website, StoryRobin.com and in a forthcoming iBooks. By entering the contest, you consent to the publication of your work if it is selected, and you grant permission for the Museum and StoryRobin to print the work in future iBooks and publicity pieces.  If you do subsequently publish your work in another publication, proper attribution must be given to iBooks and/or the Museum website.  As a condition of submission, you will be required to agree to the terms of the Contributor Agreement specifying your rights and obligations under the contest terms.

Submission Assign To Due Date Instruction Score Reviews
View Writings: 0
Drawings: 0
Open to all kids 2014-05-17

Abacus (2400 BCE) – Like a calculator, but uses beads that slide back and forth to get the answer.  You might see them in use today in San Francisco’s Chinatown.

Illustrate the origin of Abacus:
A long long time ago, a man named Lishou was responsible for keeping track of things for his village. As the number of things changed, he had a hard time calculating them. Lishou began mixing up the livestock population with the weight of the harvested grains. “We have 30 sheep. Last month, we received 8 lambs. Last week we ate 2 lambs. This week, 3 sheep died, but we received 5 more sheep from the neighboring village. Oh, I am confused. “ He said.

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1650 CE – Slide Rule – A mechanical device, shaped like a ruler with parts that slide back and forth. It can do multiplication, division, square roots and many other complex mathematical operations. The slide rule was in wide use for 300 years, its use ending in the 1970’s when electronic calculators were perfected.

Illustrate this situation: An abacus is difficult to learn and use. Multiplication and division are very cumbersome, unless you are highly skilled. 

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Drawings: 1
Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1642 – Mechanical Adding Machines – They could do addition and subtraction only and were the size of a large toaster. 

Illustrate this problem: “It takes so long to total the population of our country. I wish a machine could do it by itself.”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1855 – The Babbage Difference Engine – Designed by Charles Babbage to do virtually all mathematical operations. It was not actually built until 2001 and was the size of two big refrigerators.  

Illustrate this: Let’s look at the problem of designing a water draining system for a city. To drain properly, the pipe must drop 4” every 8’. How deep will the pipe be a mile away?

(answer: 1 mile = 5280’  5280/80 = 66. 66 * 4” = 264, 264/12 =~ 22’. The pipe will be 22’ deep.)

View Writings: 0
Drawings: 0
Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1890 – Hollerith Census Tabulator – A census is when all the people in a nation are counted. After the people are counted, the huge numbers must be added and analyzed. An early computer, perhaps the first real computer, was used to assist in this task.   

Illustrate this problem: “How can I calculate all the people in a nation, add them up, and analyze them?” (what is the sample used to analyze this country’s population?)

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17
1922 - Norden Bombsight –  This device provided a very practical application for an early computer, called an “analog” computer. It was invented by Carl Norden. Today’s computers are called “digital” computers because they use 1’s and 0’s. Norden Bombsight helps bomber aircrafts aim when dropping a bomb directly on the target in war. The machine takes into account the speed of wind and other factors.
 
Problem to illustrate:  An bird spots an annoying pig dancing ugly in the barn. It stops, drops an egg. Oh, no, it missed because of the wind. The second time, it calculates the speed of wind. Bingo! 
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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1941 - Zuse Z3 – The first “programmable” computer, meaning that you could give it instructions (like from a modern day keyboard) and it would act on them. 

Illustrate this:  The first “programmable” computer: “Computer, computer, 2 cups of lemon juices, plus 1 cup of sugar, how many cups of lemonade are in this litre flask?”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1945 – Turing Automatic Computing Engine – This device, invented by Alan Turing, formed the model for all computers to follow because it could actually store a program, just like a modern computer stores programs like Microsoft Windows, Apple OS-1 or games. 

Illustrate this: “Computer, computer, 3 cups of milk, plus 1 cup of cocoa, how many cups of hot chocolate are in this litre flask? Use the same formula I told you last week for lemonade.”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1951 – Mainframe Computer – The first truly large (the size of a bus) computers were built by a company called Univac.  They were used for census data (again) and complex financial transactions.  They used “batch” processing which means you load up all the data, push the button and the calculation starts…kind of like making a “batch” of cookies where you combine all the ingredients and put them in the oven. 

Illustrate this: “I am a computer, so smart that I can instantly do lots of things, such as design games, do all your math homework problems, count all the stars in the sky, recognize faces, play music, and etc.”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1970’s – Minicomputer – A computer that was small (the size of a small dog house) and cheap enough to be used in many businesses for many types of jobs. 

Illustrate this: “I am as smart as my grandfather, the giant computer, but I am so small (like my dog’s house), you can take me to your office. I can help you do some chores. ”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1972 – Desktop Computer – The smallest computer made so far with the keyboard, monitor and computer all in one machine the size of a breadbox.  These devices planted the seed for the personal computer that we see in our homes and libraries. 

Illustrate this: “My family is effective at losing weight. I am so small, you can take me home.”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1971 - Pocket Calculator – As the electronics get smaller thanks to the use of integrated circuits (IC’s), the hand held calculator that we know of today became possible. The operations performed by the Babbage Engine (the size of a couch) can now be performed by a device the size of a playing card. The smaller and cheaper these computers are, the more places they can be used and the more things they can do.  

Illustrate this: “Now I shrink to fit your pocket.”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1988 – Laptop Computers – Even smaller, more capable IC’s made it possible to perform even more complex operations on a computer the size of a thick magazine that you could put on your lap…from the 1951 computer (the size of a bus) to the much more capable laptop (the size of a thick magazine). 

Illustrate this: “Now I am not only smaller, but also smarter. My grandparents can’t talk with this human. But I can. Please poke my tummy, called a keyboard, and that thing called a mouse. Want to play a game?”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1993 – Internet Search – The start of the Internet.  Early use was limited and slow but it has matured to the universal tool we all take for granted today.   

Illustrate this: “Want to play a game with your friend, who sit in front of his computer in his house?”

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Open to all kids 2014-05-17

1999 – Gigahertz Processing – The increased speed of our computers makes it so we don’t have to wait long to download a game or movie. Gigahertz means that the computer can process 1 billion operations per second (that is one thousand times one million).

Illustrate this: “I am not only getting smarter, but also looks more beautiful. Look at the pictures, watch the videos. Do you agree?”


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